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So, my RAMs are good ? (11 passes, 10 hours)

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  • So, my RAMs are good ? (11 passes, 10 hours)

    Click image for larger version  Name:	 Views:	1 Size:	15.5 KB ID:	37959

    Hi there!
    I'm having stability issues at nearly all games. My new OEM built PC crashes and it is really annoying.
    I'm testing all components.
    Yesterday i tested RAM modules with memtest86 v7.3 UEFI.
    Here is the photo of results.
    Can i sure about my RAM modules are safe to use according to these results? (11 passes, 10 hours)
    (Some people say we must test it for 24 hours or 72 hours etc.)

    Thanks.
    Memtest86 Crucial DDR4 RAM results
    Last edited by TechnoStyle; 06-04-2017, 12:48 PM.

  • #2
    To have a reasonable level of confidence only a few passes are required.

    If only games crash then the next most likely cause would be the video card.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by David (PassMark) View Post
      To have a reasonable level of confidence only a few passes are required.

      If only games crash then the next most likely cause would be the video card.
      Thanks for reply!
      Browsing etc. doesn't cause any crash. I only have this crash problem with heavy games. (Metro Last Light, Crysis etc.) But sometimes same levels run for 4 hours sometimes only 5 minutes. If PSU defective, it shouldn't allow me play for 4 hours i think. But don't know.

      I have another concern about memtest. Should I also run BIOS version? According to readme file, BIOS version can control every section of the RAM but UEFI version can't control the section which it uses for itself...

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      • #4
        BIOS version can control every section of the RAM but UEFI version can't control the section which it uses for itself
        But old style BIOS and UEFI BIOS have a memory map. In BIOS the memory map is called e820.

        This memory map lists ranges of addresses that in use by hardware or BIOS itself, or are free for use by the operating system or MemTest86.

        Here is a sample from the e820 structure.

        BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000baf1c000-0x00000000baf1efff] reserved
        BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000baf1f000-0x00000000baf9efff] ACPI NVS
        BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000baf9f000-0x00000000baffefff] ACPI data
        BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000bafff000-0x00000000baffffff] usable
        BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000bb000000-0x00000000bf9fffff] reserved
        ...
        BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fee00000-0x00000000fee00fff] reserved
        BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000ffd80000-0x00000000ffffffff] reserved
        BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000100000000-0x00000001bfdfffff] usable


        The memory map in UEFI is similar. In both cases there are some addresses that can never be tested.

        But the BIOS version of MemTest86 can move itself around in the RAM address space (relocation itself). Meaning slightly more RAM can be tested as a result. But it is a tiny tiny amount, maybe around 0.1% extra RAM to test on a typical machine.

        More significant is the amount of RAM reserved by BIOS/UEFI. The new UEFI BIOSs use a lot more RAM for their own operations. They are like a little operating system. So there is less free RAM in UEFI compared to BIOS. The actual different depends on the BIOS firmware and hardware installed, but it can be around 3% of the RAM is unavailable for testing.



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        • #5
          Originally posted by David (PassMark) View Post

          But old style BIOS and UEFI BIOS have a memory map. In BIOS the memory map is called e820.

          This memory map lists ranges of addresses that in use by hardware or BIOS itself, or are free for use by the operating system or MemTest86.

          Here is a sample from the e820 structure.

          BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000baf1c000-0x00000000baf1efff] reserved
          BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000baf1f000-0x00000000baf9efff] ACPI NVS
          BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000baf9f000-0x00000000baffefff] ACPI data
          BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000bafff000-0x00000000baffffff] usable
          BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000bb000000-0x00000000bf9fffff] reserved
          ...
          BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000fee00000-0x00000000fee00fff] reserved
          BIOS-e820: [mem 0x00000000ffd80000-0x00000000ffffffff] reserved
          BIOS-e820: [mem 0x0000000100000000-0x00000001bfdfffff] usable


          The memory map in UEFI is similar. In both cases there are some addresses that can never be tested.

          But the BIOS version of MemTest86 can move itself around in the RAM address space (relocation itself). Meaning slightly more RAM can be tested as a result. But it is a tiny tiny amount, maybe around 0.1% extra RAM to test on a typical machine.

          More significant is the amount of RAM reserved by BIOS/UEFI. The new UEFI BIOSs use a lot more RAM for their own operations. They are like a little operating system. So there is less free RAM in UEFI compared to BIOS. The actual different depends on the BIOS firmware and hardware installed, but it can be around 3% of the RAM is unavailable for testing.


          Windows 10 uses nearly 2 GB RAM at idle mode. Memtest86 UEFI probably uses much less then Windows.
          I don't have stability issues with general usage or light games (COD:WAW etc.)
          If RAMs are defective it can cause crashes even at idle mode i think.

          "...but it can be around 3% of the RAM is unavailable for testing."
          Games probably doesn't use the first %3 of the RAM section which didn't test because of test program usage.
          Also The own RAM test program of Windows didn't find any error. (cache: enabled, all tests are selected, 15 passes. It took at least 4-5 hours if i remember correctly.)

          Sorry for my bad English.

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          • #6
            Here is the result: RAMs are completely fine.
            I bought a new graphics card and all problems solved.

            I'm sorry to be late to comment.

            Comment

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